Auto Draft

Anyone in production will understand when I say (camera) model numbers are the secret handshake of our industry. When I entered the workforce, a conversation between professionals consisted of PD170, DVX100 and, unfortunately, Beta cam. Those were simpler times. Since the advent of high definition and tapeless recording, we have gone through model numbers like water. In the Panasonic realm you have HVX200′s, SDX900, HPX2000 (or 3000 or 3700 or 2700), to name a few. Sony has its own groups like the EX1, EX2, EX3, the HVR series and the ever-changing f-series. Then there are outliers like the RED One, or the Canon 7D, 5D MKII, or 1D. That is a lot to remember and the functionality of all of these cameras is different.

But do not fret; one thing has remained consistent—the creative talent and the expertise behind the camera. As professionals, we choose the best tool for the job. On every project, we weigh the strengths of each camera by taking into consideration different codecs (recording formats), transcription time in post-production and most importantly, the final delivery medium. If we really want to use the latest and greatest technology, we hypothesize about any hiccups we may encounter and how to solve foreseeable problems. The best part is we find this stuff fun and we make the process invisible. In the end we deliver a shiny, well-assembled program, shot and edited using the latest technology to ensure that the end product will last for several years (aside from the ever changing fashion trends).